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Royal Castle

The Royal Castle in Poznan dates from 1249 and the reign of Przemysl I. One of the main castles in Poland.
Royal Castle
The Royal Castle in Poznan dates from 1249 and the reign of Przemysl I. One of the main castles in Poland, it was largely damaged during the Second World War but has since been partially rebuilt. Building of the castle was almost certainly started by Przemysl I in 1249 on hill later called Gora Zamkowa (Castle Mountain, Latin mons castrenis), and now better known as Gora Przemyslawa (Hill of Przemys? (or Przemys?aw)). The first building was a habitable tower made of bricks with a whell inside, and the rest of the hill was bounded by a rampart with a palisade. A small ducal house was incorporated into the system of city walls in the late 13th century. The son of Przemysl I, Przemys? II, hoping for reunification of Poland under his law decided to build a larger castle, more proper for a king. In 1295 Przemys? became king of Poland, but he was assassinated a year later. The castle wasn't completed. Work started by Przemys? was continued by a branch of the Piasts from Glogow ruling in Greater Poland, and completed before 1337. The castle served as the house of prince Casimir, then-governor of Greater Poland.


Branicki Palace

The Branicki Palace is an 18th-century magnate's mansion in Warsaw, Poland.
Branicki Palace
The Branicki Palace is an 18th-century magnate's mansion in Warsaw, Poland. It is situated at the junction of Podwale and Miodowa Streets. The Palace is one of three with the similar name in Warsaw. This exacting Branicki Palace is on Miodowa Street. The new building that stood where the palace now stands was a 17th century mansion of the Sapieha family sold in the beginning of the 18th century to Stefan Miko?aj Branicki. This led to the recent palace, built in 1740 by Johann Sigmund Deybel for Grand Crown Hetman Jan Klemens Branicki. In the construction also participated a Jan Henryk Klemm (1743), Jakub Fontana (1750) and sculptor Jan Chryzostom Redler? The now rococo palace was increased by inspiration of French palaces.The layout was shaped like a horseshoe, with a central part corps de logis and two surface wings. The construction was set back from the street by a cour d'honneur, a symmetrical courtyard set apart in this way, at which the honored visitor arrives. The facades were equalizing with worthy rococo decoration and rooftop windows. Major entrance was decorated with a portico of four columns and sculptures on the top.


Bruhl Palace

The Bruhl Palace, otherwise known as Sandomierski Palace standing at Pi?sudski Square.
Bruhl Palace
The Bruhl Palace, otherwise known as Sandomierski Palace standing at Pi?sudski Square. It was a great palace and one of the most gorgeous rococo buildings in pre-World War II Warsaw. This was built between the years 1639-42 by Lorenzo de Sent for Crown Grand Chancellor Jerzy Ossolinski in Mannerist style. It was built on the plan of elongated rectangular with two hexagonal towers at garden side of the structure. The palace was adorned with sculptures - allegory of Poland above the major portal, four figures of kings of Poland in the niches and a statue of Minerva crowning the roof. Possible inspiration to palace's upper parts pavilion with feature roof was Bonifaz Wohlmut's reconstruction of Belvedere in Prague, 1557-1563.After the Chancellor's death the property was inherited by his daughter Helena Tekla Ossolinska, wife of Aleksander Michal Lubomirski, Starost of Sandomierz (from whom it takes its name). Later, between 1681 - 96, it was reconstructed and remodeled by Tylman van Gameren and Giovanni Bellotti for Prince Józef Karol Lubomirski - Aleksander Micha?'s son.


Copper-Roof Palace

The Copper-Roof Palace is an 18th-century palace in Warsaw, Poland.
Copper-Roof Palace
The Copper-Roof Palace is an 18th-century palace in Warsaw, Poland. It takes its curious name (which is less precisely phrased in the Polish original) from its copper roof — a rarity in the first half of the 18th century. The fort since 1989 is a branch of the Royal Castle Museum. The palace is nearby with Warsaw's Royal Castle and down a slope from the Castle Square and Old Town. The Copper-Roof Palace now hosts a group of oriental carpets and other products of the oriental ornamentation art, donated to the museum by Mrs. Teresa Sahakian. The benefactress, who was born in Warsaw but lives in Belgium, created with her husband George, an Armenian, orientalist and carpet expert, a huge collection, which she decided to donate to her home city. In the beginning of 90' she recognized a "Teresa Sahakian Foundation" and she donated more than 500 rugs and carpets to the Royal Castle in Warsaw. In December 2007 other collection of carpets, rugs and other oriental and European art works attached the collection in Warsaw which is presented in the Copper-Roof Palace. The group consists of 579 objects of which 562 are textiles.


Czapski Palace

The Czapski Palace is a considerable palace in the center of Warsaw, at 5 Krakowskie Przedmiescie.
Czapski Palace
The Czapski Palace is a considerable palace in the center of Warsaw, at 5 Krakowskie Przedmiescie. It is measured one of the most distinguished examples of rococo architecture in Poland's capital. The construction, just across the street from the University of Warsaw, has been home to some famous people, including artist Zygmunt Vogel, composer Frederic Chopin and poets Zygmunt Krasinski and Cyprian Norwid. The palaces now house the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts.


Kazanowski Palace

The Kazanowski Palace also known as the Radziejowski Palace was a great palace in Warsaw, occupying the place where the Charitable Center Res Sacra Miser stands today.
Kazanowski Palace
The Kazanowski Palace also known as the Radziejowski Palace was a great palace in Warsaw, occupying the place where the Charitable Center Res Sacra Miser stands today. When Prince Wladyslaw Vasa became an adolescent, his father Sigismund III Vasa bought him a Bobola's wooden mansion at the Krakowskie Przedmiescie in Warsaw. Shortly after his return in 1628 from a journey to Western Europe the prince ordered Constantino Tencalla, royal designer, to build him a new palace in Italian style. Tencalla created one of the most superb palaces ever built in Warsaw. The rich Kazanowski Palace was ransack and burned down during the Deluge in 1656 and was never rebuilt.


Kazimierzowski Palace

The Kazimierzowski Palace or Kazimierz Palace is a construction in Warsaw, Poland.
Kazimierzowski Palace
The Kazimierzowski Palace or Kazimierz Palace is a construction in Warsaw, Poland, adjacent to the Royal Route, at Krakowskie Przedmie?cie 26/28. Initially built in 1637-41, it was rebuilt in 1660 for King John II Casimir (Polish: Jan II Kazimierz Waza, from whom it takes its name) and again in 1765-68, by Domenico Merlini, for the Corps of Cadets established by King Stanis?aw August Poniatowski. Since 1816 the Kazimierzowski Palace has served sporadically as the seat of Warsaw University. Following the devastations wrought by the Deluge, the Villa Regia was rebuilt twice, in 1652 and 1660, to designs by Izydor Affait or Titus Livius Burattini, and came to be called the "Kazimierz Palace" for King Jan II Kazimierz, who favored it as a house. Abandoned in 1667, the fortress later became the property of King Jan III Sobieski. In 1695 the building was completely destroyed by fire. On April 5, 1769, the patriotic play Junak was presented on a Cadet Corps stage in the palace. In 1794, after the repression of the Ko?ciuszko Uprising, the Corps of Cadets was closed down.


Kotowski Palace

Kotowski Palace was a 17th-century palace in Warsaw, Poland.
Kotowski Palace
Kotowski Palace was a 17th-century palace in Warsaw, Poland. It served as a major cloister building for sisters of Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration. It was construct sometime between 1682 and 1684 for Adam Kotowski and his wife Ma?gorzata Durant. A large, three-storied baroque building in Palladian style was planned by Tylman van Gameren. In 1688 it was purchased by Queen Maria Kazimiera and transferred into a place of Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration. In 1688–92 the Kotowski house was transformed into a church-cum-cloister by Tylman van Gameren. In the 18th century the monastery was enlarged. In about 1745 the new palace was built at the New Town Market Square and in 1771–79 the king Stanis?aw Augustus Poniatowski recognized a new building situated at the escarpment. Those two buildings were related in 1788. During the Second World War, the construction was used as a hospital. This made it a common target for bombing by the Germans in the Warsaw Uprising. The palace was entirely destroyed and was never restored.


Krasinski Palace

The Krasinski Palace is a baroque palace in Warsaw, Poland. It is situated on Krasinski Square.
Krasinski Palace
The Krasinski Palace is a baroque palace in Warsaw, Poland. It is situated on Krasinski Square. The palace was built in 1677-83 for the Voivode of P?ock, Jan Dobrogost Krasinski, according to plan by Tylman of Gameren. It was decorated with the pediment reliefs showing the triumph of the legendary "ancestor" of the ?lepowron and Korwin Polish clans, the Roman commander Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus and sculptural job, all by Andreas Schlüter. It had too a plentiful baroque decoration inside. In 1765 the palace was purchased by the Rzeczpospolita as a seat of Treasury Commission. After the fire in 1783 it was partially rebuilt inside according to Domenico Merlini's design.The palace was burned down and demolish by the Germans during the World War II. It was later rebuilt. Nowadays it is a part of the Polish National Library's Special Collections Section (Manuscripts and Old Prints) from the Za?uski Library .The building's facade features sculptures by Andreas Schluter. The decorations inside the building were designed in the 1780s by Domenico Merlini and were restore after World War II. Nearby there is a garden, accessible to the public since 1768.


Krolikarnia

Krolikarnia is a historical palace in Warsaw, Poland in classic style, with a neighborhood in Mokotow district of Warsaw.
Krolikarnia
Krolikarnia is a historical palace in Warsaw, Poland in classic style, with a neighborhood in Mokotow district of Warsaw. A museum of Polish sculptor and artist Xawery Dunikowski is situated in the palace since 1965. The palace is named for its former position as a rabbit warren for King Augustus II the Strong the Palace was built between 1782 and 1786.


Lazienki Palace

The Lazienki Palace - Baths Palace also called the Palace on the Water is a neoclassical fortress in Warsaw's Royal Baths Park.
Lazienki Palace
The Lazienki Palace - Baths Palace also called the Palace on the Water is a neoclassical fortress in Warsaw's Royal Baths Park. The construction Began as a bathhouse for Stanislaw Lubomirski Herakliusz, owner of adjacent Ujazdow Castle. Stanislaw August Poniatowski DECIDED to convert it into private quarters, and it was remodel by Domenico Merlini between the years 1764 to 1795. The palace was almost destroyed by the Germans in World War II. Afterwards the palace served as a quarters. The fortress is built on an artificial island that divides the lake into two parts, a smaller northern lake and a larger southern one. The palace is associated to the surrounding park by two Ionic colonnaded bridges. The facades are unified by an entablature carried by giant Corinthian pilasters that relate its two floors and are crowned by a balustrade that bears statues of mythological figures. The north facade is pleased by a central pediment portico. On the south face, a deep central recess lies behind a screen of Corinthian columns.


Lelewel Palace

Lelewel Palace was a rococo palace on the Miodowa Street in the Warsaw Old Town, which was also informally named "Palace Street" because of its gorgeous palaces.
Lelewel Palace
Lelewel Palace was a rococo palace on the Miodowa Street in the Warsaw Old Town, which was also informally named "Palace Street" because of its gorgeous palaces. Lelewel Palace was built in 1755 by Ephraim Szreger on an estate to have been documented belongings of King John III Sobieski and maintaining the original Corps de Logis. The drawings of the exterior and the interior are well-preserved. For the staircase he planned wall paintings Which differ only in marginal details from the wall paintings in the staircase of the Appartement des Princes in the Palace of Versailles Which will have been well-known through engravings in Poland in the third volume of 1738 of Mariette's L 'Architecture française. The left wing of the ensemble was added by the designer Simon Gottlieb Zug after Constance Jauch had sold the estate. The building is relevant for the history of architecture in Poland because it shows the influence of the baroque style of the Saxon building authority for Szreger which was working until he emerged as the most significant exponent of neoclassical architecture in Poland.


Mostowski Palace

Mostowski Palace is an 18th-century palace in Warsaw, Poland, situated at ul. Nowolipie 2 prior to World War II, at ul. Przejazd 15.
Mostowski Palace
Mostowski Palace is an 18th-century palace in Warsaw, Poland, situated at ul. Nowolipie 2 prior to World War II, at ul. Przejazd 15. The palace had been built in 1762-65 in the Baroque style for the Wojewoda of Minsk, Jan Hylzen August. In 1795 it became, by inheritance, the property of Tadeusz Mostowski, Duchy of Warsaw minister of internal dealings. The palace was purchased by the government in 1823-24 and reconstruct in the classicist style according to a design by Antonio Corazza. The construction became the place of the Congress Poland's Commission of Internal Affairs and Police, and a venue of concerts by Fryderyk Chopin. In 1831 the palace was taken over for the wants of the Russian Army. Renovated in 1920, it became the place of various municipal offices. During World War II, in 1944, it was damaged by the Germans, except for the facade. After the war, in 1949, the Mostowski Palace was reconstructed. It is now the place of Warsaw's police headquarters.


Ostrogski Palace

Ostrogski Palace, otherwise known as Ostrogski Castle is a great manor in the city center of Warsaw, at Tamka Street.
Ostrogski Palace
Ostrogski Palace, otherwise known as Ostrogski Castle is a great manor in the city center of Warsaw, at Tamka Street. The spot for the palace, a great lot of land on the Vistula escarpment directly below the Nowy ?wiat, was bought by Prince Janusz Ostrogski in early 17th century. As the region had been still a suburb of Warsaw and exempted from the laws of the city which prevented the inhabitants from private building fortifications, Ostrogski decided to build a little castle there. For that he financed a bastion on which the manor was to be built. In late 19th century a further story was added in 1913 and a new, much larger place for the Institute was built adjacent to the palace.


Potocki Palace

Potocki Palace is a great baroque palace in Warsaw located at Krakowskie Przedmiescie Street 15, directly opposite the Presidential Palace.
Potocki Palace
Potocki Palace is a great baroque palace in Warsaw located at Krakowskie Przedmiescie Street 15, directly opposite the Presidential Palace. It was initially built for Denhoff family and succeeded by Potocki family in the end of 18th century. The new building that stood where the palace now stands was burned down by Sweds and Germans of Brandenburg in 1650s. The new one was commissioned by Ernest Denhoff and construction started in 1693 under the designer Giovanni Pioli. From 1731 it belongs to August Aleksander Czartoryski. Under the Czartoryski family, the palace underwent numerous renovations. In 1760 the building facade was refashioned. Also new alcove outbuildings and two wings facing the street, completed with a storeyed pavillons with mansard roofs were established. The fence was planned in the neorococo style by Leandro Marconi. Palac Potockich was torn down in 1944 by the Germans after collapse of the Warsaw Uprising. It was reconstruct after the war in 1948-1950 according to design by Jan Zachwatowicz.


Presidential Palace

The Presidential Palace also known as Palac Koniecpolskich, Lubomirskich, Radziwillow, and Palac Namiestnikowski in Warsaw, Poland.
Presidential Palace
The Presidential Palace also known as Palac Koniecpolskich, Lubomirskich, Radziwillow, and Palac Namiestnikowski in Warsaw, Poland, is the stylish classicist latest version of a building that has stood on the Krakowskie Przedmiescie site since 1643. Over the years, it has been reconstruct and remodeled many times. For its first 175 years, the palace was the private property of numerous aristocratic families. In 1791 it hosted the authors and advocates of the Constitution of May 3, 1791, of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, Europe's first recent codified national constitution, and the world's second after the U.S. Constitution. It was in 1818 that the palace began its ongoing career as a governmental structure, when it became the place of the Viceroy of the Polish (Congress) Kingdom under Russian occupation. Following Poland's resurrection after World War I, in 1918, the construction was taken over by the newly reconstituted Polish authorities and became the seat of the Council of Ministers.


Royal Castle

The Royal Castle in Warsaw is a royal palace and was the official house of the Polish monarchs.
Royal Castle
The Royal Castle in Warsaw is a royal palace and was the official house of the Polish monarchs. It is situated in the Plac Zamkowy in Warsaw, at the entrance to the Old Town. The personal offices of the king and the administrative offices of the Royal Court of Poland were situated there from the 16th century until the Partitions of Poland. In its long history the Royal Castle was frequently devastated and plundered by Swedish, Brandenburgian, German, and Russian armies. The Constitution of May 3, 1791, Europe's first recent codified national constitution, as well as the second-oldest national constitution in the world, was drafted here by the Four-Year Sejm. In the 19th century, after the collapse of the November revolution, it was used as an administrative center by the Tsar. Between 1926 and World War II the palace was the place of the Polish president, Ignacy Mo?cicki. Nowadays it is a historical and national monument, and is listed as a national museum.


Sapieha Palace

Sapieha Palace is the palaces in Warsaw New Town district of Warsaw, Poland.
Sapieha Palace
Sapieha Palace is the palaces in Warsaw New Town district of Warsaw, Poland. The palace, commissioned by Jan Fryderyk Sapieha, Chancellor of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, was constructing in Baroque style in 1731-1746 by Jan Zygmunt Deybel. In 1818-1820 it was converted into the Koszary sapiezyriskie barracks for make use of the army. The Neo-Classical remodelling in the early 19th century was the job of Wilhelm Henryk Minter. During the November Uprising of 1830 - 1831 it served as the barracks for the well-known Polish 4th Infantry Regiment. Damaged in 1944 by German occupying forces, it was rebuilt in the 1950s by Maria Zachwatowiczowa.


Saxon Palace

The Saxon Palace (Palac Saski) was one of the most characteristic buildings in prewar Warsaw, Poland.
Saxon Palace
The Saxon Palace (Palac Saski) was one of the most characteristic buildings in prewar Warsaw, Poland. The Saxon Palace had initially been a private palace of the Morsztyn family (Pa?ac Morsztynów), then had been purchased and enlarged by the first of Poland's two Saxon kings, August II (reigned in Poland 1697–1706 and 1709-1733). In the early 19th century, the Saxon Palace housed a school in which Frederick Chopin's father taught French, living with his family on the palace ground. The Palace was remodel in 1842. After World War I, the Saxon Palace served as the place of the Polish General Staff. In 1925, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was recognized within the colonnade-topped arcade that joined the Palace's two symmetric wings. The Palace continuous to be sandwiched between the Saxon Garden, to its rear, and the Saxon Square in front (which would be renamed Pi?sudski Square after the Marshal's death in 1935). It was in this construction that the German Enigma machine cipher was first broken in December 1932 and then read for several years prior to the General Staff Cipher Bureau German section's 1937 move to new, especially designed quarters near Pyry in the Kabaty Woods south of Warsaw.


Staszic Palace

Staszic Palace is a palace on Nowy swiat Street 72, Warsaw, Poland. Today it is the seat of the Polish Academy of Sciences.
Staszic Palace
Staszic Palace is a palace on Nowy swiat Street 72, Warsaw, Poland. Today it is the seat of the Polish Academy of Sciences. The history of the Staszic Palace dates to 1620, when King of Poland Zygmunt III Vasa ordered the building of a small Eastern Orthodox chapel, as a proper place of burial for the former tsar Vasili IV of Russia and his brother, Dmitry Shuisky, who died in Polish captivity after having been captured a number of years earlier during the Polish-Muscovite War (1605-1618). As the population was typically Catholic, Protestant or Jewish, there was little need for an Orthodox chapel and in 1668 another Polish king, Jan Kazimierz Waza, transferred the chapel to the Dominican Order, who would be caretakers of the construction until 1808. After Poland regained independence in 1918, in 1924-26 the palace was restored to its earlier neoclassical style by architect Marian Lalewicz. In the Interbellum it hosted numerous organizations: the Warsaw Scientific Society, Mianowski's Bank, the National Meteorological Institute, the French Institute and the Archeological Museum of Warsaw. The palace was injured during the 1939 siege of Warsaw and nearly razed during the Warsaw Uprising (1944). In 1946-50 it was reconstruct in its original neoclassical form. Today it is the seat of the Polish Academy of Sciences.


Tyszkiewicz Palace

The Tyszkiewicz Palace or Tyszkiewicz - Potocki Palace is a fortress at 32 Krakowskie Przedmiescie in Warsaw, Poland.
Tyszkiewicz Palace
The Tyszkiewicz Palace or Tyszkiewicz - Potocki Palace is a fortress at 32 Krakowskie Przedmiescie in Warsaw, Poland. It is one of the most gorgeous neoclassical residences in the city. The palace was sponsor by Field Hetman of Lithuania, Ludwik Tyszkiewicz. The building begun in 1785 initially following plans by Stanis?aw Zawadzki and finished in 1792 in Neoclassical style to Jan Chrystian Kamsetzer's design. In 1840 the fortress was bought by the Potocki family. In the interwar period it was the place of Bank Gospodarstwa Krajowego, and later, of Polish Academy of Literature. Burned in 1944, it was reconstructing, and is now shared by the Academy of Literature and University of Warsaw. The relatively modest facade of the palace is decorated with some well stuccowork, and the central balcony is supported by four elegant stone Atlantes carved in 1787 by Andre Le Brun.


Ujazdow Castle

Ujazdow Castle is a fort in the historic Ujazdow district, between Ujazdow Park and the Royal Baths Park, in Warsaw, Poland.
Ujazdow Castle
Ujazdow Castle is a fort in the historic Ujazdow district, between Ujazdow Park and the Royal Baths Park, in Warsaw, Poland. The first fort on the spot was erected by the Dukes of Masovia as early as the 13th century. However, in the following century their court was moved to the future Royal fort in Warsaw, and the Ujazdow Castle fell into neglect. In the 16th century, a wooden manor was constructing there for Queen Bona Sforza. The ruins of the castle of the Mazovian princes were then incorporated into a new fortified manor built by King Sigismund III Vasa for his son, future King Wladys?aw IV Vasa. However, there is small evidence that the house was ever used by the young prince, who spent much of his youth either at his father's court. Between 1659 and 1665, the construction housed the mint of Titus Livius Boratini, who their struck his well-known boratynka, a type of solidus coin. Again neglected, in 1674 the castle was bought by Stanis?aw Herakliusz Lubomirski and then rented to King August II, who ordered the building there of a new royal house. The castle, incorporating much of the earlier constructions on the place, was built by Tylman of Gameren, a notable 17th-century architect and engineer. The gardens surrounding the castle, later divided into two separate parks, were refurbished. The palace's rebuilding was almost complete by 1784, when work was abandoned and the building donated to the Polish Army.