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Abbasis' House

Abbasis
Abbasis' House is a large traditional historical house located in Kashan, Isfahan Province, Iran. Built during the late 18th century, the house is a beautiful example of Kashani residential architecture. It is said to have been the property of a famous cleric. It has six courtyards that would fit the needs of different families. It is located near the Tabatabaei House in the old historic neighborhood of Kashan. One of the chambers has a ceiling designed with mirror pieces so as to give the impression of a starry sky under the nocturnal glitter of candlelight. The house also was designed with secret passageways, perhaps designed for the escape of the family in times of invasion and emergencies. The house is now a museum and is protected by Iran's Cultural Heritage Organization.


Ameris' House

Ameris
The Ameris' House, or House of the Ameri family, is a traditional house in Kashan, in Isfahan Province, in Iran. Built in the mid 19th century during the Qajar era, the house is one of several large spectacular old houses in the central district of Kashan. Like the other houses around it, it was re-built after Kashan was ravaged by a series of massive earthquakes in the 18th century.The house is now a public museum, and is protected by Iran's Cultural Heritage Organization.


Behnam House

Behnam House
The Amir Nezam House or The Qajar Museum of Tabriz, is a historical building in the Sheshghelan district, one of the oldest quarters of the city of Tabriz, Iran. The base of the edifice covers an area of 1200 square metres. This monument which since 2006 houses a museum dedicated to the Qajar dynasty (1781-1925), was built in the period of the Crown Prince Abbas Mirza (1789-1833). It was renovated by Hasan-Ali Khan, Amir Nezam Garrousi, in his position as the Major-domo of Azarbaijan, and used as his residency. In the subsequent periods, the house was employed as the official residence of the provincial governors of Azarbaijan. Because of persistent neglect over a long period of time, this building had come to be in such a bad state of disrepair that for a time it was seriously considered to demolish it and build a school in its place. Between 1993-2006 it has been subject of an extensive renovation process and since the completion of this undertaking it has been granted the National Heritage status. The Sheshghelan district has been Governor's seat during the Ilkhanate dynasty. Hasan-Ali Khan, Amir Nezam Garousi , was born in 1820 in Bijar, in the Kurdistan Province. For a period of twenty-two years he served in various governmental positions. In particular, for a period he was in charge of the Iranian students sent to Europe by the government of Iran. He also served as the General of the Garrus Army and Head of the Security Guards of the High Court and of Arg-e Tabriz. He is buried in Mahan, in the Kerman Province. He is best remembered for his exemplary prose in the Persian language.


Behnam House

Behnam House
The Behnam House is one of the historical buildings of Tabriz, Iran, built during the later part of the Zand dynasty (1750-1794) and the early part of the Qajar dynasty (1781-1925), as a residential house. During the reign of Nasereddin Shah Qajar (from 1848 until 1896) this building was substantially renovated and embellished with ornamental paintings. The house consists of a main building, referred to as the Winter Building, and a smaller structure, referred to as the Summer Building. The Winter Building is a two-storyes symmetrical construction standing on a basement. Like many traditional houses in Iran, this house has an inner and an outer courtyard, the former being the larger of the two. In the course of a recent renovation project, some hitherto unknown miniature frescoes were discovered in this house which at present is being restored by specialists. The Behnam House is part of the School of Architecture of Tabriz Islamic Art University.


Babak Fort

Babak Fort
Babak Fort, Babak Castle, or Bazz Galasi also known as the Immortal Castle or Republic Castle, is a large citadel on the top of a mountain in the Arasbaran forests, which is located 16 km southwest of Kalibar City in northwestern Iran. It has been identified as the stronghold of Babak Khorramdin, the leader of the Khurramites in Azerbaijan who fought the Abbassids.


Borujerdis' House

Borujerdis
Borujerdis' House is a famous historic house in Kashan, Iran. The house was built in 1857 by architect Ustad Ali Maryam, for the bride of Haji Mehdi Borujerdui, a wealthy merchant. The bride came from the affluent Tabatabaei family, for whom Ustad Ali had built the Tabatabaei House some years earlier. It consists of a rectangular beautiful courtyard, delightful wall paintings by the royal painter Kamal-ol-molk, and three 40 meter tall wind towers which help cool the house to unusually cool temperatures. It has 3 entrances, and all the classic signatures of traditional Persian residential architecture, such as biruni and daruni (andarun). The house took eighteen years to build using 150 craftsmen. It is considered a true masterpiece of Persian traditional residential architecture. Haidarzadeh’s house is situated in Maghsoudieh suburb of Tabriz on the south side of Tabriz Municipality building. There is no document shows the date of construction of this historical house but studies revealed that the house constructed about 1870 by Haji Habib Lak. The house was registered in the list of National Remains of the Country in 1999 under the number 2524. It covers an area of 900 sq. meter and has two floors. The house has two interior and exterior yards which are separated by house. In the basement, there is an ingenious Howz-Khaneh (a large room with a small pool with a fountain in the middle) ornamented with colorful bricks and vault. Other parts of the house are connected together through a hall. The building was ornamented with wooden-worked windows (called Orosey), stuccoes, colorful glasses, brick workes and paintings. The main room (Shah neshin) is one of the most attractive rooms of the house. Haidar zadeh’s house was restored in 2001 and is used as Tourism Information Center of East Azerbaijan province and Tabriz. There are few historical houses next to the Haidar Zadeh’s house such as Salmasi, Behnam House, Ganja-i Zadeh and Ghadaki House.


Castle of Ardeshir

Castle of Ardeshir
Castle of Ardeshir e Babakan, also known as the Atash-kadeh, is a castle located on the slopes of the mountain on which Ghal'eh Dokhtar is situated on. Built in AD 224 by Ardashir I of the Sassanian Empire, it is located two kilometres (1.2 miles) north of the ancient city of Gor, i.e. the old city of Firouzabad in Fars, in ancient Persia. The structure contains three domes, among other features, making it slightly larger and more magnificent than its predecessor, the nearby castle of Ghal'eh Dokhtar. However, it seems that the compound was designed to display the royalty image of Ardashir I, rather than being a fortified structure for defense purposes. That is why perhaps it would be best to refer to the structure as a "palace" rather than a "castle", even though it has huge walls on the perimeters (twice as thick as Ghal'eh Dokhtar), and is a contained structure. From the architectural design, it seems the palace was more of a place of social gathering where guests would be introduced to the imperial throne. What is particularly interesting about this palace is that its architectural design does not exactly fall into that of the Parthians or even Sassanian category; the design is a unique design particular to architects of Fars. The palace was built next to a picturesque pond that was fed by a natural spring, perhaps in connection with the Persian goddess of water and growth, Anahita. The spring is thought to have fed a royal garden, in the same way that Cyrus had his garden (bustan) built at Pasargadae. The pond was tiled on its sides, surrounded by pavement for guests of the royal court to enjoy the evenings by. The structure is 104 m (340 ft) by 55 m (180 ft). The iwan is 18 m (60 ft) high, although it has partially collapsed. The structure was built of local rocks and mortar with plasterwork on the insides. The style of the interior design is comparable to that of Tachar palace at Persepolis.


Seghat ol Islam

Seghat ol Islam
House of Seghat ol Islam is a historical house of Seghat ol Islam who was a reformist of the Qajar era living in Tabriz, Iran. The House of Seghat ol Islam is located in Farabi Street of Tabriz, next to Saheb ol Amr Mosque and Madrasseh Akbarieh.


Qavam House

Qavam House
Qavam House is a traditional and historical house in Shiraz, Iran. It was built in the mid to late 1800s by Mirza Ibrahim Khan. The Qavam families were merchants originally from Qazvin. But they soon became active in the government during the Zand dynasty, followed by the Qajar and Pahlavi dynasty as well. The Qavam "Naranjestan" preserves the elegance and refinement enjoyed by the upper class families during the nineteenth century. The paintings on the low ceilings of the house are inspired by Victorian era Europe.


Niavaran Palace

Niavaran Palace
Niavaran Palace Complex is situated in the northern part of Tehran, Iran. It consists of several buildings and a museum. The Sahebqraniyeh Palace from the time of Nasir al-Din Shah of Qajar dynasty is also inside this complex. The main Niavaran Palace, completed in 1968, was the primary residence of the last Shah, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and the Imperial family until the Iranian Revolution. The main palace was designed by the Iranian architect Mohsen Foroughi. The Niavaran Palace Complex traces its origin to a garden in Niavaran, Tehran, that was used by Nasir al-Din Shah as a summer residence. The palace erected by Nasir al-Din Shah in this garden was originally referred to asThe Niavaran Palace and was later renamed The Sahebqraniyeh Palace. During the reign of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi all the peripheral buildings of The Sahebqraniyeh Palace, with the exception of The Ahmad-Shahi Pavilion were demolished and the buildings and the structures of the present-day Niavaran Palace Complex were built to the north of The Sahebqraniyeh Palace. In this period, The Ahmad-Shahi Pavilion served as an exhibition area of the presents of the world leaders to Iran.


Saadabad Palace

Saadabad Palace
The Saadabad Palace is a palace built by the Pahlavi dynasty of Iran in the Shemiran area of Tehran. The complex was first inhabited by Qajar monarchs and royal family in the 19th century. After an expansion of the compounds, Reza Shah lived there in the 1920s. And his son, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi moved there in the 1970s. After the Iranian Revolution, the complex became a museum. However, the current presidential palace is located adjacent to the Sa'd Abad compound. Currently, parts of the Saadabad Palace compound are museums, in which visitors can roam through and look at the rich history of Iran, and some parts of the compound are used by the Iranian Cultural Heritage Organization which is responsilbe for most of the artifacts, locations, and cultural aspects of Iran. Also, the palace named "Kakhe malakeye madar" nowadays belongs to the presidency organization, and hosts the president's foreign guests.